Information You Need to Know to Help You Build Your Bracket in 2017

Building a bracket is easy.  Building a perfect bracket is effectively impossible, so you are not likely to achieve such a lofty goal. With 68 teams, there are 147,573,952,589,676,412,928 possible brackets (if one only considers the 64 teams in the main bracket, excluding the First Four. the number drops to 9,223,372,036,854,775,808). Since not all brackets are equally likely, the odds of creating a perfect bracket are better than these numbers indicate, albeit still quite remote. That being said, even building a good bracket is challenging.  It is difficult to imagine teams seeded No. 1, No. 2, or No. 3 losing early in the tournament, yet they do, with great regularity.  The challenge is deciding which of (and when) these seeds will lose. However, there are some patterns that have consistently emerged to help you avoid a bad bracket.

In the round of 64, the 5-12 upset gets a great deal of attention. In the 32 tournaments from 1985 through 2016, the No. 12 seeds had a 46-82 record. In fact, in 14 of the past 32 tournaments, two or three No. 12 seeds advanced to the round of 32. What gets less attention is the 6-11 upset. In the 32 tournaments from 1985 through 2016, the No. 11 seeds had a 46-82 record. Moreover, in 14 of the past 32 tournaments, two, three, or all four No. 11 seeds advanced to the round of 32. Collectively, an average of 4.48 teams seeded No 11 or lower (worse) advanced to the round of 32. Also, in 24 of the past 32 tournaments, four or more teams seeded No 11 or lower (worse) advanced to the round of 32. However, an average of 1.68 teams seeded No. 13 or lower (worse) have won in this round, so picking one such upset is prudent.

How should your upsets be distributed in the round of 64? Eliminating the discussion on the 8-9 matchup, which is essentially a toss-up game (the No. 8 seed owns a 64-64 advantage), 24 out of 128 regions (19%) over the past 32 tournaments has had all of the top seven seeds advance. Moreover, in 39 out of 128 regions (30%) over the past 32 tournaments, exactly six of the top seven seeds have advanced, while in 47 out of 128 regions (37%) over the past 32 tournaments, exactly five of the top seven seeds have advanced. In only in 8 out of 128 regions (6%) over the past 32 tournaments have exactly four of the top seven seeds have advanced, while in 10 out of 128 regions (8%) over the past 32 tournaments, exactly 3 of the top seven seeds have advanced. Therefore, upsets should be spread thinly across the regions. If you feel really lucky, have one region "blowup."

In the round of 32, teams seeded No. 7 and lower continue to advance. In 28 of the past 32 tournaments, two or more of these teams have reached the Sweet Sixteen, with an average of 3.47 of these teams reaching this round. In fact, only once (1995) in the past 32 tournaments has there not been a team seeded No. 7 or lower reaching the Sweet Sixteen. Moreover, an average of 1.50 teams seeded No. 11 or lower reached the Sweet Sixteen, and in 28 of the past 32 tournaments, one or more of these teams reached the Sweet Sixteen. Among highly seeded teams, in 22 of the past 32 tournaments, 8 or fewer teams seeded No. 1, No. 2 or No. 3 reached the Sweet Sixteen.

The Final Four draws the most attention. The following table gives the probabilities for the number of No. 1 seeds that reach this round.

P(Zero No. 1) 0.170
P(One No. 1) 0.379
P(Two No. 1) 0.317
P(Three No. 1) 0.118
P(Four No. 1) 0.016

It is over 10 times more likely for a Final Four to contain zero No. 1 seeds than it is to contain four No. 1 seeds. Picking one or two No. 1 seeds in the Final Four is prudent.

Some interesting factoids that may help you set your Final Four:

The odds against one or more No. 16 seeds reaching the Final Four is 535 to 1.
The odds against one or more No. 15 or No. 16 seeds reaching the Final Four is 209 to 1.
The odds against one or more No. 14, No. 15, or No. 16 seeds reaching the Final Four is 107 to 1.
The odds against one or more No. 13 through No. 16 seeds reaching the Final Four is 61 to 1.
The odds against one or more No. 12 through No. 16 seeds reaching the Final Four is 36 to 1.
The odds against one or more No. 11 through No. 16 seeds reaching the Final Four is 22 to 1.  This has happened three times over the past 32 tournaments (1986, 2006, 2011).
The odds against one or more No. 10 through No. 16 seeds reaching the Final Four is 13 to 1. 
This has happened four times over the past 32 tournaments (1986, 2006, 2011, 2016).
The odds against only teams seeded No. 3 or lower (worse) reaching the Final Four is 34 to 1.  This has happened only once over the past 32 tournaments (2011).
The odds against only teams seeded No. 1, No. 2, or No. 3 reaching the Final Four is 2.41 to 1.  This has happened 11 times over the past 32 tournaments (1989, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009).
The odds against only teams seeded No. 1 or No. 2 reaching the Final Four is 7.36 to 1.  This has happened 3 times over the past 32 tournaments (1993, 2007, 2008).

Enjoy filling out your bracket and watch the upsets unfold. Let the games begin!

 

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